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Food Evolution Revolution: The Cutting Edge Fusion of Archaeology, Anthropology, and the Modern Kitchen

William Schindler III

FOOD EVOLUTION The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. Eighth St., hosts a free and open to the public 6:45 p.m. lecture, “Food Evolution Revolution: The Cutting Edge Fusion of Archaeology, Anthropology, and the Modern Kitchen,” with guest speaker William Schindler III. Understanding the role that technology played in our 3.4 million-year-old dietary past is essential in learning to rethink food and eat like humans again, asserts Mr. Schindler, associate professor of anthropology and archeology at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland and co-star of the National Geographic series, The Great Human Race. More infois at cmc.edu/athenaeum/open-events, (909) 621-8244 or at athenaeum@cmc.edu.


Food Evolution Revolution

Understanding the role that technology played in our 3.4 million-year-old dietary past is essential in learning to rethink food and eat like humans again, asserts William Schindler, associate professor of anthropology and archeology at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland and co-star of the National Geographic series, The Great Human Race. Biologically speaking, humans and human nutritional needs remain relatively unchanged over the centuries; yet our cultural needs have seismically shifted and our expectations of taste, smell, texture, and presentation have significantly changed the way we think about food. By fusing lessons from our dietary past with modern culinary techniques, Schindler believes we can create (and live with) a food system that is meaningful, accessible, relevant and delectable!

William Schindler is an experimental archeologist and primitive technologist. His research and teaching revolve around a comprehensive understanding of prehistoric technologies including lithic (stone tool) technologies, prehistoric ceramic technologies, projectile technologies, hunting, foraging, hide working, fiber technologies and all aspects of prehistoric food acquisition, processing, storage, and consumption. 

I love being human

 An advocate of traditional foodways, Schindler is constantly seeking new ways to incorporate lessons learned from his research into modern diets. His outlook on food has revolutionized the way in which he and his family eat and he attributes much of the health his wife and three children enjoy to the hunted, gathered, and fermented foods that comprise a significant portion of their diets.

The recipient of multiple awards and featured in many television and media outlets, Schindler is equally at home in the middle of the forest armed with a hand-made bow stalking a deer or in a college classroom delivering a lecture to a group of students. Schindler lives what he teaches and teaches what he lives.

Claremont McKenna